World oil and the ANWR potential
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World oil and the ANWR potential

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Published by Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Petroleum industry and trade -- Economic aspects,
  • Energy policy -- United States,
  • Petroleum reserves -- Alaska,
  • Oil and gas leases -- Alaska,
  • Energy consumption -- United States,
  • Petroleum products -- Prices,
  • Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesWorld oil and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge potential, CRS report for Congress
StatementRobert L. Bamberger, Carl E. Behrens
SeriesReport (Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service) -- no. 87-438 ENR, Major studies and issue briefs of the Congressional Research Service -- 1987-88, reel 5, fr. 00156
ContributionsBehrens, Carl E, Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination14 p.
Number of Pages14
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15456014M

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The question of whether to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) has been an ongoing political controversy in the United States since As of , Republicans have attempted to allow drilling in ANWR almost fifty times, finally being successful with the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of ANWR comprises 19 million acres ( million ha) of the north Alaskan.   The Truth About ANWR market, what effects the oil extracted from ANWR would have on world oil supply interest in all the issues surrounding the potential opening of .   High potential. The high potential for significant discoveries of oil and gas in ANWR has long been recognized. Early explorers of the region at the turn of the century, found oil seeps and oil-stained sands. However, since ANWR was established in , exploration in the region has been restricted to surface geological investigations, aeromagnetic surveys, and two winter seismic surveys .   Alaska politicians are furious about Obama's proposal to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil and gas development. They've argued ANWR is .

In this article, we'll explore ANWR's Area , its potential oil reserves and its wildlife. We'll also look at how oil development in ANWR could affect world oil production and U.S. consumption. First, let's get a better picture of this disputed region. To ensure an enduring habitat, the Alaska National Interest Land Conservation Act (ANILCA) banned development within ANWR's borders. When ANILCA was signed in , Section of the act set aside , ha of the 1,, ha coastal plain of ANWR for evaluating potential .   For 30 Years, a Political Battle Over Oil and ANWR The political saga around whether to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is one of tricky legislative maneuvers, late-night. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR or Arctic Refuge) is a national wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska, United consists of 19,, acres (78, km 2) in the Alaska North Slope region. It is the largest national wildlife refuge in the country, slightly larger than the Yukon Delta National Wildlife refuge is administered from offices in nates: 68°45′N °30′W / .

  The high potential for significant discoveries of oil and gas in ANWR has long been recognized. Early explorers of the region at the turn of the century, found oil seeps and oil-stained sands. However, since ANWR was established in , exploration in the region has been restricted to surface geological investigations, aeromagnetic surveys.   Oil and gas extraction is a menace to wildlife. Loud noises, human movement and vehicle traffic from drilling operations can disrupt avian species’ communication, breeding and nesting. The infrastructure built for energy development can also get in the way. Powerlines, wellpads, fences, and roads fragment habitats for many species. In the ongoing energy debate in Congress, one recurring issue has been whether to allow oil and gas development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR, or the Refuge) in northeastern Alaska. ANWR is rich in fauna and flora and also has significant oil and natural gas potential. ANWR is rich in fauna, flora, and oil and natural gas potential. Its development has been debated for more than 50 years, but sharp increases in energy prices from late to early , in , and in from a variety of causes (e.g., terrorist attacks, oil spills, and energy infrastructure damage from hurricanes), have repeatedly Author: Michael Ratner, M. Lynne Corn, Kristina Alexander.