The syntax of ellipsis
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The syntax of ellipsis evidence from Dutch dialects by Jeroen van Craenenbroeck

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Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Dutch language -- Dialects -- Syntax,
  • Dutch language -- Dialects -- Ellipsis

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementJeroen van Craenenbroeck.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPF746 .C736 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22542053M
ISBN 109780195375640, 9780195375657
LC Control Number2008040040

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`The Syntax of Silence, based on Jason Merchant's excellent PhD dissertation (), is a major contribution to our understanding of ellipsis. It is the most important work on the sluicing ellipsis construction since Ross's seminal article, and it is the most detailed examination ever of this fascinating ellipsis construction.'Cited by: these works, which have set the course for teaching syntax over the years. Within this book, Chapters 1 to 5 cover the fundamental notions of English grammar. We start with the basic properties of English words, and then rules for combining these words to form well-formed phrases and, ultimately, clauses. These chapters guide students through theCited by: The Syntax of Ellipsis investigates a number of elliptical constructions found in Dutch dialects within the framework of the Minimalist Program. Using two case studies, Van Craenenbroeck argues that both the PF-deletion and the pro-theory of ellipsis are needed to account for the full range of elliptical phenomena attested in natural by: The talk argues for an analysis of ellipsis that combines:(i) the licensing of the antecedent-anaphor relationship in elided structures via mutually entailing Givenness, modulo focus (Rooth , Merchant ) with (ii) a syntax based phase driven account of ellipsis (Rouveret , Chung , Boskovic ). The connection between the syntax and semantics of ellipsis .

The Syntax of Ellipsis investigates a number of elliptical constructions found in Dutch dialects within the framework of the Minimalist Program. Using two case studies, Van Craenenbroeck argues that both the PF-deletion and the pro-theory of ellipsis are needed to account for the full range of elliptical phenomena attested in natural language. Ellipses and Dashes in Email. In business email, the ellipsis () and dash are often used in nonstandard ways. One cause of their popularity is growing uncertainty about standard punctuation rules. Confronted with a pause they are unsure how to punctuate, many emailers gravitate towards the seemingly all-purpose ellipsis or dash. The ellipsis is also called a suspension point, points of ellipsis, periods of ellipsis, or (colloquially) "dot-dot-dot".. Depending on their context and placement in a sentence, ellipses can indicate an unfinished thought, a leading statement, a slight pause, an echoing voice, or a nervous or awkward silence. Aposiopesis is the use of an ellipsis to trail off into silence—for example: "But. A Comparative Syntax of Ellipsis in Japanese and Korean 5 cannot be elided when the embedded object is scrambled out of the target CP as well as the antecedent CP.

  A verb phrase ellipsis occurs in a sentence when a verb phrase (a construction made up of a verb and a direct or indirect object, such as "buys food" or "sells cars") is omitted. Bob wants to go to the store, and Jane wants to as well. In the second half of this sentence, the verb phrase "go to the store" is : Richard Nordquist. Andrew Carnie’s bestselling textbook on syntax has guided thousands of students through the discipline of theoretical syntax; retaining its popularity due to its combination of straightforward language, comprehensive coverage, and numerous exercises. In this third edition, topics have been updated, new exercises added, and the online resources have been expanded. Changing the Subject is so far by far my favorite new book of ” —The Review of Contemporary Fiction “ Changing the Subject doesn’t live up to its title, it consumes it. Though the stories make high use of syntactical or symbolic repetitions, they are also powerfully digressive, hallucinatory. ” —Bomb Magazine’s Editor’s Choice. An ellipsis (plural: ellipses) is a punctuation mark consisting of three dots. Use an ellipsis when omitting a word, phrase, line, paragraph, or more from a quoted passage. Ellipses save space or remove material that is less relevant. They are useful .